Increasing Stitches
How to Knit an Increase Knitwise and Purlwise

Increasing stitches simply means that you need to add an extra stitch or stitches to your knitting.

Once you are comfortable with the basic knitting stitches - knit and purl you will need to learn how to knit an increase so that you can start working on some simple knitting patterns.

By adding stitches you will be shaping your knitting and making the fabric wider. For instance when you knit a sleeve for a sweater your upper arm is wider than your lower arm and wrist area so you will gradually start increasing stitches as you knit up the sleeve.

There are many ways to add extra stitches but for now I will show you the basic knit increase called knit front and back (KFB), also called the bar increase. If you look at your knitting after the increase you'll notice a little bar.  Don't worry though.  It is hardly noticeable.

By knitting increases this way you will be making two stiches out of one and it's really easy to do.


Also at the end of the increasing stitches lesson you will also find an explanation on how to increase stitches evenly across your row.  I think you're gonna love this one.


Increasing Stitches Knitwise

The first part is just the knit stitch so we'll go through it again. With your right needle push through the first stitch on your left needle from front to back. Then take your working yarn (ball end) and wrap it around right needle.

increases stitches
increasing stitches knitwise

Then bring it through the stitch on the left needle just like the picture. At this point you are just making the knit stitch.

increasing stitches
increasing stitches knitwise

So your new knit stitch now sits on the right needle and the loop (stitch) is on the left needle. Don't drop the loop that's on the left needle yet.

increasing stitchesincreasing stitches knitwise

This is where you start increasing stitches. With your right needle go into back of stitch on left needle.

increasing stitches knitwise

Wrap yarn around right needle (just like the knit stitch) counterclockwise.

increasing stitches knitwise

With yarn wrapped around right needle lift the left needle up and over the wrapped yarn on right needle..

increasing stitches

And there you go. Pretty great isn't it?  Now you know the knit front and back kfb increase.

increasing stitches knitwise

Knit Front Back (KFB) Video - English Method

Knit Front Back (KFB) Video - Continental Method

Increasing Stitches Purlwise

Increasing stitches on a purl row? You can do that?

You betcha!

It is a little trickier to work but it can be done.

You see most knitting increases are worked on the right side (knit side) which means that you would make a knit increase.

Sometimes though you may get a knitting pattern that asks you to increase purlwise. It doesn't happen too often but at least this way you'll know how to do it.

You may have to manipulate your needles but you'll get it.

Basically what you will be doing is the purl stitch but you won't drop the loop off your left needle. Once
again you will work a purl stitch in the back of the same loop. It's just like the knit front and back only this is the purl front and back.

Here's how to do it.. Get your fingers ready.

The beginning starts off with the purl stitch so make sure your yarn is in the front of your work.

increasing stitches purlwise

With your right needle insert it into the first loop on the left needle just like purling.

increasing stitches purlwise

Bring yarn around right needle counterclockwise, snug it up a bit.

increasing stitches purlwise
increasing stitches purlwise

With right needle and the yarn still wrapped, bring it through loop on left needle.

So up to this point you have just done a purl stitch.

increasing stitches purlwise

DO NOT drop the loop (stitch) from your left needle. You will now work into the back of that loop to create a purlwise increase.

increasing stitches purlwise

This is tricky and I tried very hard to make the picture as clear as possible so that you can understand.

Make sure your working yarn is still in the front of your work.

In this picture I moved my left needle around because you have to insert the right needle in the stitch on
the left needle from the outside. See how I am doing it in the picture? I know this is tricky but you can do it!

increasing stitches purlwise

See how in this photo (below) the stitch is twisted? Don't worry its supposed to be like that.

Bring working yarn around right needle counterclockwise.

increasing stitches purlwise
increasing stitches purlwise

Bring your right needle with the yarn wrapped around it through back of stitch on left needle. See how my right needle is going through the stitch kind of backwards on the left needle? Just keep bringing the needle through.

increasing stitches

There you go. You can now drop the loop from the left needle.

increasing stitches
increasing stitches

There it is.  The right needle has your new purl increase stitch

increasing stitches

Purl Front Back (PFB) Video - English Method

Purl Front Back (PFB) Video - Continental Method

Increasing stitches isn't so difficult is it? Now you know how to do basic knitting increases and purl increases.


Knitting Increases Evenly Across a Row

Your knitting pattern says to increase stitches evenly across a row.  What do they mean exactly?

A lot of times in sweater patterns for instance, after you have worked the ribbing, you will often see that you have to increase more stitches for the body of the sweater.  And the increases are usually done at evenly spaced intervals across the row.

You see if you increased all the stitches at once you would end up with a big clump of extra fabric in one spot and the rest of your knitting would be quite tight.  So how do you do it?

Easy.  Divide the amount of stitches on your needle by the number of increases you need to make.  For example say you have 80 stitches on your needle and you need to increase 8 stitches.  Divide 80 by 8 and you get 10.  So on every 10th stitch do a knit increase.

But what if it doesn't come out evenly?  Say you have 83 stitches on your needle and you need to increase 8 stitches what then?  83 divided by 8 = 10.38 so all it means is that most of your increases will be on the 10th stitch and you will need to do a couple of increases on the 11th stitch that's all. 

You just want to make it as even as you can and sometimes it won't be precise.

But There is Something Even Better

Know what I do?  I don't bother calculating this anymore because I found a wonderful website that does all the calculating for me. (And besides I am so terrible at math)

This girl created a bunch of calculators for various knitting calculations.  I just love it and I think you will too. 

So when you need to do the math for  knitting increases evenly across a row go check this out.  All you need to do is enter in a few details and it calculates where to put those increases. 


Increasing stitches to knitting instructions

Increasing stitches to home

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